Miscellaneous

Our miscellaneous page has been created and devoted to the very many of pieces and items of African Art that perhaps does not fit into a precise category or have an accurate place within a title.  Within the miscellaneous page we covering a whole host of those wonderful, fascinating and intriguing curiosities that have a place all of their own.

We have lovely collection of textiles that come from the Kuba Kingdom, all of them beautifully patterned with the geometric designs. Each and every piece is a unique handcrafted work of art. Tribal spoons carved very styled and carrying their own prestige, African games such as oware/ mancala, utilitarian pieces, baby carriers, traditional African dress, to name a few.

This page displays many of those wonderful items of art that are made and used in Africa on a day to day basis, many as important and functional as the more prestigious tribal figures or tribal masks but as equally as needed for the everyday life. The pieces that still have a place in any collection, giving a true picture of African living.

Sometimes it is those very special pieces that go into the miscellaneous section that give us the greater insight into the real world of where and what we are beginning to discover.

Songye Shield

Their history is closely linked to the Luba's to whom the Songye are related through common ancestors. Having waged war against one another for a long time, the Songye and Luba later formed an

Dogon Body Dance Adornment

Worn along side a raffia skirt and wrist adornments complimenting the mask, of which there are many, this cowrie shell adornment completes this tribal dance attire.

Kuba Nchak Dance Skirt

Made of three panels of woven raffia, with a delicate embroidered pattern/design, surrounded or edged with wide strips of cut-pile textile. These strips also are embellished with embroidered triangles and circles

Yaka Diviners Slit Drum

Drums are among the most important art forms in Africa, used both as a musical instrument and as a work of sculpture significant in many ceremonial functions, including dance, rituals, story telling and communication of messages

Kuba Nchak Dance Skirt

The Nchak for ordinary day to day wear is usually a white and red garment worn wrapped around the lower body and held at the waist or beneath the breasts by a folded band of cloth or a belt made of twisted multi strand fiber.

Kuba Nchak Dance Skirt

The Kuba are primarily farmers, and they have developed a society in which everyone plays his or her distinctive role. Textile production is one such activity in which men and women work together

Dogon Ladder

Old Dogon ladder from the ex collection of Seward Kennedy. The Dogon made many different items for utilitarian and practical use, they are very well known for the ladders they made, the elaborately carved doors, over eighty different styled masks and a large number (unknown) tribal figures for ceremony and ancestor worship for different cults.

Kuba Shoowa Textile

The art of making Kuba cloth is very time consuming and can take several days to form a small piece. The men first gather the leaves of the raffia tree and then dye it using mud, indigo or substances from the cam wood tree

Kuba Textile Kaasai Velvet

A beautiful Kuba Textile. Kuba textiles are unique in the Demorcratic Repulic of the Congo formerly Zaire, for their elaboration and complexity of design and surface decoration.

Kuba Textile

After they’ve completed the base cloth the women embroider it. They do this by pulling a few threads of the raffia fibers, inserting them into a needle running the needle through the cloth until the fibers show up on the opposite end.

Kuba Textile

A lovely Kuba textile showing a stunning geometric design, typical of the Shoowa people of Kuba Kingdom DRC. Using the leaves of the raffia tree, the Kuba people of the Congo first hand cut, and then weave the strips of leaf to make pieces of fabric

Kuba Textile

Kuba people in the Republic of the Congo have made beautifully embroidered ritual cloths of raffia. Men weave the plain-weave ground fabrics on simple vertical looms, then women ornament these textiles with imaginative geometric patterning

Kuba Textile

After they’ve completed the base cloth the women embroider it. They do this by pulling a few threads of the raffia fibers, inserting them into a needle running the needle through the cloth until the fibers show up on the opposite end.

Kuba Textile

The art of making Kuba cloth is very time consuming and can take several days to form a small piece. The men first gather the leaves of the raffia tree and then dye it using mud, indigo or substances from the cam wood tree.

Kuba Textile

Each patch is symbolic and many times a piece has many different meanings. When Kuba cloth originated there were probably no patches used, but as the cloth is brittle it is quite likely that the patches were used to repair the frequent tears.

Kuba Textile

Using the leaves of the raffia tree, the Kuba people of the Congo first hand cut, and then weave the strips of leaf to make pieces of fabric, called raffia cloth. There are several different sub groups of the Kuba people. Each group has different and unique ways to make the fabric

Dogon BouBou Tunic

Very striking and vibrant Dogon BouBou with wonderful use of classic colour and motives. Made from the traditional Bogolan cloth of the Dogon people. Among many styles of clothing made by the Dogon with the Bogolan cloth the Boubou tunic is the most

Dogon Mancala

Mancala within the Dogon tribe are handed down from generation to generation as gifts or once someone has passed away, so these games are normally kept within a family for many years until they do not function in the way they are meant to.

Kuba Shoowa Textile

Kuba people in the Republic of the Congo have made intricately embroidered ritual cloths of raffia. Men weave the plain-weave ground fabrics on simple vertical looms, then women ornament these textiles with imaginative geometric patterning

Kuba Textile

This beautiful Kuba Textile made by the people of the DRC displays all of the usual traditional style, colour and geometric design we have become use to seeing within such captivating and complex works of Kuba textile artwork

Kuba Textile

The most commonly known of the Kuba textiles are the cut-pile Shoowas or Kassai Velvets, named after the river along which the Kuba live. Work on high quality velvet can last a month or even more. Textiles are woven by men and embroidered by women.

Kuba Shoowa Textile

The most commonly known of the Kuba textiles are the cut-pile Shoowas or Kassai Velvets, named after the river along which the Kuba live. Work on high quality velvet can last a month or even more. Textiles are woven by men and embroidered by women.

Mbuti Pygmy Bark Cloth

An interesting piece of Mbuti Pygmy Bark Cloth from DRC. Before the colonial era bark cloth was the main item of both men and womens clothing. It is the men who harvest the bark from the fig tree and then also go on to cut and pound the raw material

Massai Mancala

PROVENANCE: Ex Seward Kennedy Collection. Mancala is a generic name for a family of 2-player turn-based strategy board games played with small stones or seeds and rows of holes or pits in the earth, a board or other playing surface.

Dayak Baby Carrier

A Dayak baby carrier highly decorated for display of wealth and prestige of a family and to protect the baby when it left the safety of the communal long house and compound. They were only used when mother and baby were away from home. The design of most women's art is defensive, designed to erect defensive barriers between their families and malignant spirits.

Dogon Hunters Shirt

A fantastic and authentic Dogon hunters shirt / tunic, covered in an array of trophy horns, mirrors,bones and cowrie shells. This garment, shirt, or tunic were worn by Dogon men for protection in the forest, from both wild animals and dangerous spirits.

Dogon Yo Domolo Thief's Crook Staff (RESERVED)

Held in the hand or worn over the shoulder, these curved staffs are the emblem of the society of yona (ritual thieves). The principal activity of the society seems to occur at the funeral of one of its members, stealing domestic animals to be sacrificed and eaten at the funeral ceremony

Dogon Hunters Tunic and Hat

This garment, shirt, or tunic were worn by Dogon men for protection in the forest, from both wild animals and dangerous spirits. A successful hunter must not only be master of the forest and wild animals, but must also have the spiritual power necessary to negotiate the dangerous supernatural realm.

Dan Spoon (SOLD)

These are also known as Dan “wake mia or wunkirmian” spoons, and are carved for the most hospitable village women and a symbol of fecundity and the women bring out their spoons when a ceremony of women is being rejoiced.

Rare Dan Guere Spoon

A very rare Dan Guere spoon, this beautiful piece is very different to a "wake mia or wunkirmian", as this is not a feasting spoon but one only ever used for agricultural rites ceremonies. Once an agricultural ceremony is arranged and in place this spoon has a scoop like place on the handle that libations are poured.

Kuba Shoowa Textile

A beautiful and symmetrical hand made Kuba Shoowa textile from the Kasai region of Kuba Kingdom Democratic Republic of Congo. This is signed "Maxombo" on the rear also with an "M" which can be seen in the photos. A really superb piece and a nice rarer design.

Kuba Shoowa Textile

These are beautiful old handmade textiles and excellent quality, collected from villages by our guys in the Congo.

Kuba Shoowa Textile

The art of making Kuba cloth is very time consuming and can take several days to form a small piece. The men first gather the leaves of the raffia tree and then dye it using mud, indigo or substances from the camwood tree.

Kuba Shoowa Textile

This is a beautiful later 20th Century piece handmade textile and excellent quality, collected from villages by our guys in the Congo.

Kuba Shoowa Textile

The art of making Kuba cloth is very time consuming and can take several days to form a small piece. The men first gather the leaves of the raffia tree and then dye it using mud, indigo or substances from the camwood tree.

Kuba Shoowa Textile

The art of making Kuba cloth is very time consuming and can take several days to form a small piece. The men first gather the leaves of the raffia tree and then dye it using mud, indigo or substances from the camwood tree.

Kuba Shoowa Textile

These are beautiful old handmade textiles, collected from villages by our guys in the Congo.