Dogon Hunters Tunic and Hat

Dogon hunters tunic and hat, covered with an array of trophies and objects of protection.

Tribe: Dogon

Origin: Mali

Approx Age: Late 20th Century

Materials: Material, mirrors, bird feet, monkey skulls, bones, tails

Dimensions cm: 100 (long) x 70(wide)

Ref. Number: M0576

£750.00
Description:

A fantastic and authentic Dogon hunters tunic and hat, covered in an array of trophy’s and objects of protection (animal skulls, bird feet, mirrors and bones etc). This garment, shirt, or tunic were worn by Dogon men for protection in the forest, from both wild animals and dangerous spirits. A successful hunter must not only be master of the forest and wild animals, but must also have the spiritual power necessary to negotiate the dangerous supernatural realm.

History

Worn by Dogon men for protection in the forest, from both wild animals and dangerous spirits. A successful hunter must not only be master of the forest and wild animals, but must also have the spiritual power necessary to negotiate the dangerous supernatural realm. They are often embellished with small objects, animal horns, mirrors, jewellery, and leather pouches, that provide the “spiritual armour” necessary to protect the hunter from both real and spirit force. This garment and hat has been vetted as authentic, with evidence of extensive use. This has been made / designed very well, underneath the arms it looks to be slit but is is designed this way to enable an air flow as it is all stitched properly. The blind Dogon elder Ogotemmêli taught the main symbols of the Dogon religion to the French anthropologist Marcel Griaule in October 1946. Griaule had lived amongst the Dogon people for fifteen years before this meeting with Ogotemmêli had taken place. Ogotemmêli taught Griaule the religious stories in the same way that Ogotemmêli had learned them from his father and grandfather; instruction which he had learned over the course of more than twenty years. What makes the record so important from a historical perspective is that the Dogon people were still living in their oral culture at the time their religion was recorded. They were one of the last people in Africa to lose their independence and come under French rule.

The Dogon embraced many aspects of nature, which some researchers associate with an African Traditional Religion.

Contact Exquisite African Art

6 + 10 =

Telephone: +44 (0)1623 884387

Follow us

Subscribe to our mailing list

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This