Igbo Mask

The masks, of wood or fabric, are employed in a variety of dramas: social satires,
sacred rituals (for ancestors and invocation of the gods), initiation, second burials, and public festivals.

Tribe: Igbo

Origin: South-East Nigeria

Approx Age: 1970s

Materials: Wood, material, Kaolin and pigment

Dimensions cm: 29 tall

Ref. Number: 1607

SOLD

Description:
Powerful Agiriga IGBO mask from the Mmanwu masquerade for the Okoroshi dancer. Very expressive and impressive, traditional Okoroshi styled mouth, loss of some kaolin and minor loss to the backside of the mask. Material rolled inside still which would have sat on the forehead of the dancer.

Provenance: Helmut und Marianne Zimmer, Z├╝rich.

Additional images

History

The Igbo use thousands of masks, which incarnate unspecified spirits or the dead, forming a vast community of souls. The outstanding characteristic of the many Igbo masks is that they are painted chalk white, the colour of the spirit. Masked dancers wore extremely elaborate costumes (sometimes ornamented with mirrors) and often their feet and hands were covered. With their masks, the Igbo oppose beauty to bestiality, the feminine to the masculine, black to white.

The masks, of wood or fabric, are employed in a variety of dramas: social satires, sacred rituals (for ancestors and invocation of the gods), initiation, second burials, and public festivals, which now include Christmas and Independence Day. Some masks appear at only one festival, but the majority appear at many or all. Best known are those of the Northern Ibo mmo society, which represent the spirits of deceased maidens and their mothers with masks symbolising beauty. Among the Southern Ibo, the ekpe society, introduced from the Cross River area, uses contrasting masks to represent the maiden spirit and the elephant spirit, the latter representing ugliness and aggression and the former representing beauty and peacefulness. A similar contrast is found in their okoroshi masks, which correspond to the mmo of the Northern Ibo. The Eastern Ibo are best known for masquerades associated with the harvest festival, in which the forms of the masks are determined by tradition, though the content of the play varies from year to year. Stock characters include Mbeke, the European; Mkpi, the he-goat; and Mba, which appear in pairs, one representing a boy dressed as a girl mimicking the behaviour of a girl, the other representing the girl being satirised.

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